Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Grilled Hoisin Beef – Not Necessarily Mongolian

While this grilled hoisin beef features a very similar marinade to the one in our Mongolian pork chop video, I decided against calling it, "Mongolian beef," since I realized I’m not exactly sure what that is. Same goes for the chop, but since Mustard’s Grill coined the name, we're Grandfathered in.

Hoisin sauce is an underrated, and possibly underused ingredient. That's probably due to the fact that people aren’t exactly sure what it is. Far as I can tell, it's a thickened, fermented soy-sauce-like substance, flavored with chilies, garlic, vinegar, sugar, and, of course, exotic spices. That’s really all I feel like I need to know, but if you happen to do some more research, and find out something interesting, please pass it along.

Like I said in the video, besides a decent marinade recipe, I hope this serves as a reminder for just how great a cut of beef skirt steak is. Unless you horribly overcook it, it’s always juicy, and tender, as long as you slice it across the grain. So, whether you serve it with coconut rice or not, I really hope you give this grilled hoisin beef a try soon. Enjoy!


Makes two portions:
* as with all marinades, feel free to add more of everything!
1 beef skirt steak, about a pound
1/3 cup hoisin sauce
3 tablespoons Chinese vinegar, or sherry vinegar
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons hot sauce
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
4 cloves finely minced garlic
1 packed tablespoon brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 green onion, light parts, minced
toasted sesame seeds

23 comments:

Sandy said...

Thank you for this recipe. I love skirt steak. I am wondering if you could do a recipe for a marinade of carne asada. I use Frontera Carne Asada Marinade by Rick Bayliss. It is getting harder to find in the stores and their Web site is not going to sell it anymore. If you do figure out a recipe that taste like that, it would be wonderful.

Jennifer said...

Why do you wipe off excess marinade?

Unknown said...

This is an inspiring and inspired creation. I will definitely make this. Now, I have one out of left field foodwish that I am sure you have never been asked to date. As a second generation (very very southern) Italian American, I recall hearing stories of my forefathers eating some weirdo Italian-American unique delicacy called.... "Capuzzelle di Agnello."

Eric James Swearingen said...

So, what is Hoisin sauce has of? ...and how can one make their own from scratch?

Brad Piper said...

If you don't pat the marinade off, does it turn into bark like those cooking shows Triple D where they slow cook beef all night?

Also... Chicago Deep Dish !!

KBO said...

G'day Chef John,
Thank you for this recipe. It's one of the best I've seen. You asked for comments on Hoisin sauce. For years I was never a fan of this sauce; it always seemed to kill the basic flavour of whatever was the star of the dish. I've purchased bottles of Hoisin sauce from Hong Kong, mainland China, Singapore, even Penang. All were a disappointment. Forget the Hoisins made anywhere else, some are disgusting.
Then, about five years ago I got talking to an experienced Hong Kong/Chinese chef. She told me that there are no truly accurate or decent pre-prepared Hoisin sauces sold anywhere. She insisted that the secret of Hoisin sauce was that it is a sauce, or marinade, that must be made from scratch with fresh ingredients. Done this way it is a lighter, more delicately flavoured concoction which can be made 'hotter' or milder, according to individual taste or cuisine styles. Also there is much regional variation. Some specialty Chinese cook books will give you recipes for 'homemade' Hoisin. It's well worth the extra effort. It's like you've never had a Hoisin before. If that's impossible where you live I suppose the best of a bad bunch is the Comex brand which, strangely, is a Dutch company. Cheers, Chef John, love your work!

Dean Pope said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Bret said...

I love skirt steak as well but please tell my, why is it so darn expensive? It's $20/lb near me. I always thought it was supposed to be a cheaper cut.

Courtney Blush said...

This is amazing, In the UK we have a lot of Chinese/Cantonese restaurants and one of their main regular starters is Shredded Duck in Hoisin Sauce... I love the flavour and can't wait to try it.

Dean Pope said...

If i don't have a grill on hand, would cooking this on the stove top or oven work as well? Anything i should know/be wary of if i attempt to?

rodentraiser said...

I have just got to try this. I have a recipe for hoisin chicken that I use for chicken drumsticks. In the oven, the hoisin sauce caramelizes and is so good. I have to figure out how I'm going to make this beef, though, since I don't have a grill.

Roberto said...

Did this last night using a flank steak I had on hand. Yummy. If hoisin is a plant, where can I buy seeds? If it's an animal, can I hunt it and make the sauce myself? Or, if it's a mineral, where can I get a mining permit?

Maggiesara said...

Forgive me, but I have a couple of procedural questions. First, how do I save recipes? I have clicked on the "view later" button, but the "saved" notation seems to.....disappear. In other words, it isn't saved. And in any case, even if it were saved, how the heck would I retrieve it?

And second, I see that in older recipes, there's an option to get the entire recipe in print. Much though I love Chef John's videos -- and I really do -- it's a massive PITA to have to toggle back and forth between the print (for the specific amounts) and the video (for technique). I really appreciate having the video, but once I've watched it, the direction (for example) "whisk eggs till frothy" would be a whole lot simpler than having to sit through the egg-whisking portion of the video again, just to see what comes next.

Am I being clueless? (It's been known to happen.) Is there a way to access the recipes in print that I have somehow missed?

Ramon Daniel said...

Can I make this in the oven? We don't have a grill or a stove top grill :(

Ramon Daniel said...

Can we put it in the oven? I don't have a grill or a stove top grill at the moment.

Steve said...

I made this tonight as written, except I subbed balsamic vinegar for the Chinese vinegar. I was always told that balsamic is the best substitute for dark Chinese vinegar.

I marinaded it for about 6-7 hours, and had to use my broiler instead of a grill. There is enough marinade for double the 1 pound I used.

I broiled it 4 minutes per side and it came out perfect. The flavor was delicious and the meat was juicy and tender. I served with coconut rice posted here just prior this recipie and a green salad with an Asian ginger dressing.

I will definitely make this again. Thanks Chef John! Another winner!

Ana Marimba said...

Chef John, I think someone copied your blog: http://food-wishess.blogspot.ch/
I am a big fan! Thanks for all your recipes!
AM

Anastasia said...

Can you do German Spaetzle at some point! thank you chef john!

Salli Gillespie said...

To save Chef John's recipes, they make this thing called a pen and a material called paper. It's what I use and it works great.

Rob Guthm said...

First thing to address ► I felt a bit insignificant BOTH times you flashed your Genuine Green Egg. I'm almost 100% sure you were purposely mocking my Geineunn Green Ogg. But I won't dwell ...

Most importantly, what am I supposed to do with all that leftover marinade? I went and bought all the ingredients this morning without a careful video view and am cooking it now so I guess I will see what happens when I reduce it and make a dipping sauce or something. I'm unable to process pouring it down the drain. Wish me luck cuz' I'll force my old bag Mother to dip whether it comes out good or is a failure. Things just may get ugly and I'm pretty sure you will be the only one to blame should such a scene take place!

Rob Guthm said...

@Maggiesara - super secret pro tip - if you search each dish at allrecipes.com you will find printable recipes that you can also favorite.

LuisaCA said...

Just made this tonight. Amazing flavors! So thanks for this recipe. Only thing I changed was using Sriracha I reduced the 2 tsp to 1/2 tsp.
I had to use steamed brown rice since I got home late and just assumed I had enough long grain white rice (usually I do) so trying the coconut rice will have to wait until the next time we do this.

rancholyn said...

I made this the other night and I want to say it was DELICIOUS! This recipe is a Winner and company worthy! Thanks:)