Friday, April 7, 2017

Fresh Strawberry Jam – Because Man Cannot Live on Clotted Cream Alone

Actually, I don’t think you can live on just clotted cream and fruit preserves either, but regardless, as promised, here’s my preferred method for making strawberry jam. While amazingly delicious, and quite satisfying to make, I’ll have to put this on the same list as homemade ketchup. This is fun to make once in a while, but due to the effort, and time involved, Smuckers has nothing to worry about.

This version features a lot less sugar than many recipes, which is kind of crazy, since we use over two cups, as well as a homemade pectin puree, to help tighten-up the texture. Feel free to use pectin powder or liquid instead, but I think I did a pretty good job explaining why I don’t in the video.

Strawberries should be sweet, and plentiful this time year, so if you’re looking for a fun project, especially if your last fun project was making clotted cream, I really hope you give this delicious, fresh strawberry jam a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for about 3 cups of Strawberry Jam:
For the pectin puree:
3 apples, chopped
1 lemon, chopped
1 cup water
For the jam:
3 pounds strawberries, rinsed, and trimmed
1 1/2 cups (or whatever you got) pectin puree
2 1/4 cups white sugar, added in two additions
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Please Note: To test without a thermometer, wait until the jam starts to reduce and thicken, and spoon some of the mixture on a plate, and place in the freezer for a few minutes, until the jam is cold. If it's jelled, you're done. If it's still runny, keep cooking, and testing. 

56 comments:

Phill C. said...

This looks delicious and I'm definitely going to try it. After making the pectin puree, could you sous vide instead of cooking in the stove top?

Vahne said...

So...where's the tip?

MsJokyo said...

Hiya Chef John! First post on the blog, but I wanted to ask - I hate the stuff you buy in the store, it doesn't even taste like fruit and more like sugar syrup sometimes. I'd like to be able to make jam to enjoy for awhile afterwards... so can you freeze this recipe for later? Or if you can it the old fashioned way, will it save? Thank you!!

Hugo said...

But...

You forgot to tell us the secret to knowing 220° without a thermometer.

Seth Carson said...

So, what was the tip about not using a thermometer? I can't seem to find it.

Seth Carson said...

So what was the tip for not using a thermometer? I can't seem to find it anywhere.

Robin Betts said...

Dear Chef John.. in your video, you suggested there would be what I guess would have been a set-test in the blog post, so you don't need a thermometer? It doesn't seem to be there? Feel free not to publish this comment..Just FYI

Unknown said...

You didn't say how to make the jam with no thermometer!

Alessandro Mininno said...

Can I use basically the same steps for some other kind of jam? for instance: blueberries, peaches ecc.

Peter Singels said...

Dear Chef John,

Thank you for your video's. I really like them. I use the alarm function so that I know directly when you have posted a new one. Some I will try, And with some I'm just salivating.

I have two questions:
1. I'm Dutch and use the metric system so I get a bit confused with measurements like cups, pounds etc. Is it possible to also give the metric measurements in your recipes? That would be very helpful.

2. This question is about the Strawberry Jam. How long can I keep this in the fridge before it goes bad?

Please keep making the video's.

Greeting from a Dutch fan (Peter)

Daniel Waintraub said...

I absolutely love and have made a ton of your recipes. So a big thank you for all of your hard work. Would you be able to do a video for sesame chicken and/or general tsos chicken - the chinese takeout legends??

T.R. Smith said...

Hi Chef!
What about other berries? After growing up close to Knott's Berry Farm, I have an undying love of boysenberries. And, I want to make this using your technique (natural pectin, less sugar) with those berries. Thank you! Love your work (art?).

Chris said...

i was just wondering how well this would work with other fruit like raspberries?

sagich dirdochnicht said...

As allways,nice video.
But could you at least post the ingredients in metric system,too? I know that America uses this (kind of stupid) system,but literally the whole rest of the world uses the metric system. So for people like me and propably a whole lot of viewers it would be great,we wouldnt have to convert it every single time...

Alicia said...

Other than being a bit time consuming it seems like a simple recipe. Love the color of the jam once it's made. I guess my next step now is to go see how to make clotted cream. Thanks Chef John!

cp said...

Hey there! Thanks for the great recipe. I have a question about how adaptable it is. If I wanted to try this recipe with another fruit or berry - raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, peaches, etc. - would the pectin puree still work? Also, what would be the amounts of fruit to use? Would it still be 3 pounds? Thanks again!

Jim Spatz said...

can I somehow leave chunks of strawberry in this jam?

Thickethouse.wordpress said...

Soon it will be fresh local strawberry time! Lovely recipe.

Teej Meister said...

I'm going to try this out ASAP! I love strawberry jam, but I don't really like 95% of the jam I find in stores. Hopefully this will fill that void in my life! :)

philogaia said...

Oh my! I quit making jam year ago because it took so much sugar to make it jell properly. Looks like I will be making jam again this year. And clotted cream. I've done that before and it was amazing. I had totally forgotten about it though until you posted your video.

rodentraiser said...

Aaaannnddd...there goes this diet. *sigh* Thanks, Chef John.

Phil said...

Hi Chef John! I have two questions. Did you sterilize the jars and if not, how long does the jam keep in the refrigerator?
Looks delicious!

James D said...

Chef John, this looks amazing. Can I ask how you store this. I assume that since you didn't technically can it, it should be refrigerated? If so, how long would you expect it to keep in the fridge? Thanks

Oystein Thorsen said...

How long will this last in the fridge?

Ptara said...

Hey Chef John!

Whenever I cook lemons I find that the end product has a very distinct bitter taste, which isn't very pleasant to me, from the rinds of the lemon, does this happen with this recipe, and if so, is there any substitute or is it okay to skip it?

Thank you for the recipe!

West Shady said...

So, all of the jam is jarred and put in the fridge immediately? How long does it last? Or can some go straight into the pantry, and then refrigerated as needed?

You really need to give us newbies some advice and instruction on storage and expiration.

Jats said...

Very good recipe i just try this week to do a peach marmalade and was great a strawberry marmalade is going to be mine next attemp.

thanks for the recipe.

Mary said...

What type of red apples are best to use?

Di said...

Would this work for blueberries? I love blueberry jam and it isn't as available as strawberry jam. If yes can frozen berries be used?

Russell Troxler said...

What if you were to leave out the suger all together? Would you need to reduce it longer for the pectin to work it's magic?

LarryB said...

Did I hear a Go Ducks??? A week late, darn UNC. This will help with the grieving process.

odzer said...

Chef John, I have already purchased the pectin and I am planning to make this tomorrow. Could you let me know if i skip the apple/lemon, how many grams of Pectin I should use.

Josiah Biller said...

Could you, perhaps, give it a couple drops of balsamic vinegar at the end of the cooking?

Teddy Bear said...

Approximately how long will the jars keep in the refrigerator?

UncleDG said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
UncleDG said...

Hi Chef!

My wife and I made this jam tonight and it turned out delicious. Quite possibly the best jam I've ever had. It made more than we anticipated and we'd like to freeze it. How long do you think it'll stay good in the freezer, and is there anything special we need to do beforehand?

Also, could raspberries be substituted in for the strawberries? Thanks for your blog and videos! We love them!

akaase said...

Looks like you take your cream tea Devonshire style, with jam spread over the cream on the scone. Not like those savages in Cornwall, who dollop cream atop a jam-schmeered scone.

Chef John said...

The no-thermometer tip is under ingredients at the bottom of the post!

Robincrush said...

Please Note: To test without a thermometer, wait until the jam starts to reduce and thicken, and spoon some of the mixture on a plate, and place in the freezer for a few minutes, until the jam is cold. If it's jelled, you're done. If it's still runny, keep cooking, and testing.

Charlie Zaloom said...

Chef John:
Came out great! I, as well as the kids really love it. We're up to our eyeballs in strawberries and I searched foodwishes last week for a strawberry jam and then it popped up. Simple and easy. Made exactly 32oz. Not as world-rocking as the kumquat marmalade, but very good. Thank you!

Charlie Zaloom said...

PS: Whoa. Second day tastes even better. I notice that you had it 'sit' in the fridge "1 to *2* days" for the pectin to set, but does it also affects flavor? I could detect the pectin mirepoix yesterday. Second day, it's just 1 qt of wonderful jammy strawberry greatness.

I put the skimmed off foam on vanilla ice cream and gave it to the kids as, "strawberry gristle."

Unknown said...

2 questions I have other posters also asked-

-May I use blackberries or raspberries with this method?
-How long will it keep in fridge?

crysharris said...

This is a perfect recipe. I followed it exactly and the finished product is amazing. The texture is slightly chunky and well-thickened but not seedy. I was skeptical about the merits of food processing the strawberries rather than rough chopping but the uniformity really improves the consistency. The flavor.. HOLY SMOKES! It's so delicious with the brioche toast I am eating while typing this.

This was my first time making jam of any type. My yield was 2 pints. I will be making this until strawberry season is over. How long will it hold in the fridge? I didn't do the whole canning thing, but I did sterilize my mason jars and lids.

Andy said...

I have to start by saying that I'm a big fan of yours. I enjoy watching your videos, and I have to mention that I have been successful cooking some of them. I just made the strawberry jam. Wow, it was delicious! I make enough to share with family and friends. I want to make raspberry jam as well, but I have a question about it. Should I follow the same steps as for the strawberry recipe? Or is there a different recipe for a different fruits?

Jeff Bruno said...

I found it difficult to reach 220F. I got to 210F and the jam was jumping out of the pan onto the stove. Also the bottom of the pan was scorched black in certain spots. I'll see how it tastes tomorrow after it is refrigerated.

Christina Pilz said...

Will you be able to give us a scone recipe to match the height of deliciousness that is this jam and the clotted cream recipe?

Asaf Hengari said...

I tried this recipe and it made a delicious jam, but it tasted more like apple strawberry than just strawberry. It was also a bit too runny, even though I reduced it for more than 90 minutes, and it still didn't reach 220F. I think I should have used a bigger saucepan. Anyways, I'm not sure the pectin puree did much other than adding too much liquid. my simple jam version works just as well without it

Charlie Zaloom said...

The kids (7 &11) finished off the quart in 2 weeks and now completely reject the store bought as "too sweet". I am in a jam.

Praspberry said...

Hi,
How long can you store the jam once made?

Anton Dyakulich said...

My water evaporated within like 10 minutes and I didn't even know it cuz I was busy with my strawberries, so the apples burned to the bottom of the pan. I added more water, hopefully it works out.

Ian Witherow said...

I also burned my apples. Did it lower and slower the next time around and it worked great.

Note: 220f isn't the temperature to hit for high altitude. Do a quick google on high altitude jam setting temperature to figure out what yours should be. That being said, here in Denver it was supposed to hit 211, but I never got it above 205 after an hour and a half. Cranked up the heat a little towards the end but that was a huge mistake! Burned the bottom :( Not sure if it's salvageable.

I'll try again at some point.

geneauger said...

Why is it that the instructions in the video do not appear in the recipe? It is fine to have all the ingredients but you have to play the video every time you want to make a recipe.

Himmin said...

Another win for a Chef John recipe! Thank you! I made these for my mother in laws birthday, susbstituting a quarter of the strawberries with 1/8 of blueberries and the same amount of blackberries, because well, I could, and the jam turned out delicious, not too sweet and firm within the day. This is going on my go-to homemade list. Thank god I kept some jars for myself.
Thanks Chef John! Huzzah!

Jaded1 said...

Hi, I'm wondering if this would work with frozen whole strawrberries?

A. W. said...

I just did an adaptation of this with the ingredients I can find here in Thailand, Frozen Rasberrys and limes instead of fresh strawberrys and a lemon. Worked out great! So did the dab in the freezer tip to replace the thermometer.

Susan Shirk said...

Love your videos! But I was disappointed when you started cooking the strawberries. In my opinion, as soon as you cook strawberries, they taste like jam, NOT fresh berries. I would love to see a freezer jam version of this recipe where you cook the sugar/pectin together to activate, then add strawberries at the very end off heat, so the berries don't get the cooked/jammy flavor.